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If you’re a writer you probably came to the craft wanting to express something. If it didn’t have anything to do with your personal life perhaps you needed to get your voice across about an event, opinion, or even retell a story. In that way, you knew that you had words that needed to make their way across the page so you began to scribble them down. But, what if you’re a fiction writer and you’re tasked with writing stories? How can you take something personal and create the political through the fiction craft? I’ll tell you the top five ways to incorporate social climate and messages throughout your work.


1. Create Dynamic and Meaningful Characters

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Typically, politics emerge from social interaction. The interaction between two people created something that can be commented on which then gave rise to a government or state. The people are the characters that create a given society so in fiction writing there can be features that set them apart such as a political belief, religion, sex, level of education, or even social class. All of these things work at intersections of identity which then fuses the background of a character and impacts the plot in various ways. In essence, create multicultural characters.


2. Comment and Create a Specific Setting

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There are places in society that can cause more or less social tension to happen. For example, bathrooms can be symbolic in that they can serve as an area where queer people are accepted or denied or where races are divided. Historically, bathrooms have been a place in society that has caused conflict. However, there are other settings such as a park, classroom, or even a restaurant where cultures can clash over politics.


3. Play with Concepts

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The reason why there are so many dystopian novels flying off of the shelf has nothing to do with who the writer is but everything to do with the concept. Most of the time, concepts that are well written revolve around a “what-if” scenario that incorporates some kind of social change. A dystopia is a corrupt society, however, the societal disruption happened due to some flaw in the social climate. So, make a dystopia where the concept is strong enough to be written alongside a multifaceted arc. This will give way to commentary on everyday life by distorting the idea of “what-is.”


4. Retell the Original Story

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The retelling of a specific story can be impactful if the story is clear to the reader. It can also serve as a way to change the way that history was once written. When retelling, sticking to the plot can make it clear as to what is being done, but don’t fear to stray away from the way the original story opens or close. Changing how certain characters are perceived can be a great way to convey a sense of hopefulness or despair in parallelization to our current social climate.


5. Shift the Point of View

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Lastly, changing the point of view can make the reader realize a different truth from another angle. Remember that in fiction in order to make our readers care we have to have amazing characters whose personalities are what we want to follow. If we can hook our reader to watch the story unfold from multiple different lenses then they are more likely to empathize with the political message you’re trying to convey. A great portion of writing an amazing story has to deal with empathy. And, a key component of that is choosing whether it’s the first, third, or rotating point of view that you want your reader to relate to.

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There is something that we ponder, over and over again, that is… are we our main character or is it its own entity? I’ve often pondered this myself with the creation of Angelica and Doria in both of the novels in FIGS, and I thought this would make for an interesting discussion.

You see when us writers decide to sit down and develop a story we think about our point of view, it plays a huge role in your perception. It’s almost like taking the camera and deciding just what we want you to see. Do we want you to see from our eyes outwards or by looking down from above?

Continue reading “QTNA: Am I My Character or, Is My Character its Own Entity?”

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Tara is an artsy writer that is more than creative, she’s actually pretty imaginative, and loves cats. I enjoyed getting to know Tara on Twitter, as I took the time to scroll through her recent tweets to learn more about her. I was intrigued to find that she’s a dedicated writer who doesn’t mind retweeting gifs while sharing her thoughts about how it feels to create.

Tara is located in San Francisco, CA where she is known as being a YA Author that has published a series known as Timekeeper. If you want to learn more about just what her novels are I invite you to check out her blog or just get to know her style of writing by going directly to her personal blog!

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I’m what they call an “Indie Author” because I control my own profits, what gets published and when, what I create, and how I sell. At best, I’m an entrepreneur. I make and run my own money, and at the end of a night, I create a budget for my daily life as well as my life as a writer. However, what happens when you’re in college and you can’t do this as well because you don’t have the funds?

In this essay, I’m here to share with you how I run my own business with a budget that’s below $300. And, even if you aren’t a writer, maybe this will inspire you to start up something for yourself or use something that I share with you to help you do something on your own. I’m going to keep this as short as possible so I’ll be giving you five major tips.

Continue reading “5 Tips to Entrepreneur​ on a Budget”