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Today you’re breathing as

you feel the pulsating muscles from

serving coffee

 

I have a new job every month

looking for a different one

every day while

the other one

is slipping by

the wayside.

 

I need grad school

I need scholarly people

around me or

I’ll become a 

feather in the breeze

just drifting and drifting

over people,

places

and things

 

as I create goals that

don’t really matter or just

barely exist.

 

I remember that time when I wrote like

Khalil and wanted to be in Italy with

Dante.

 

I had a long time to go,

but now,

I feel as if that time is

gone. 

Her Office is a screenplay that I’ve been writing. It was an open assignment for class and I could have written this movie about anything, but instead, I chose to write about something that means the most to me, the treatment of African Americans.

I love my culture, it influences a lot of what I do and create. I thought this would be an amazing take on the woman dynamics of power within an office setting. Granted, this movie takes place at a domestic violent call center known as Humble and Humane, it was my way of emphasizing just how culture can influence the workplace.

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This movie was inspired by a real life experience that I encountered and I don’t know any better way to share its effects other than through my art. You can expect for each scene to be published Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at noon if you would like to keep up. Today, I’m only giving a briefing of what you’re about to read.

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About Her Office:

The movie revolves around a domestic violence call center where the leading manager each morning who oversees the flow of work is a white woman named Beatrice. She can’t relate to the main characters, who are all black women, as they navigate the phone calls that are being taken. Most of the girls who call in are African American, between the ages of 18-24, and are looking for relationship advice through something anonymous and confidential.

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There is conflict around the way that Beatrice interacts with Deborah, Florence, Lorraine, Dina, and Michelle who are all black queens looking to change the way that the office is being ran. Each of the girls that are influenced by this power house manager are impacted differently outside of work. But, when in the office together these women are seeking out change in the workplace and are making demands for a more influential manager who wants to empathize with their struggles as women of color.

As tension builds and things are hard day to day for the women as they change the atmosphere of the office I would like you to reflect on the ways that this would be different if they were people of privilege. How would their roles change? Have we seen women of their type in offices before? What is the connection to management in offices today?

Stay tuned for the opening scene on Wednesday, October 10th, at noon! 

PSA: I’m still here. I haven’t been blogging lately because my schedule has been crazy, but let’s see what happens within the next few days. I have somethings that I want to share with you so I hope this is fun.

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Announcements

  1. Thank you to all of my consistent followers– the people who were still checking the website while I was under a rock, yea you guys, are the reason why I’m back. I just want to say thank you for looking out for new articles and rereading old ones. That means a lot, you have no clue.
  2. If you’ve been taking a tour on the website you might have noticed that there’s a brand new tab titled, “The Service,” I won’t be explaining what it is, I want you to check it out.
  3. I’ll be sharing a movie! Except, it’s not the kind that you’re thinking of. I wrote this for class and will be uploading the different scenes on here for you to read since I can’t find the time to write more outside of class and work at the moment. I still want you to be up to date on what I’m learning and exploring so I thought this would be interesting. I hope you enjoy it.

Sincerely,

SA

I hate when I’m in conversation with people and they ask about what I want to do with my life, well… to be honest, I just want to write. I’m sure that many writers can relate to this because it’s what we were called to do. But, there are people that don’t understand that writing is a multifaceted profession. If they don’t know, now they’re going to have the chance to know the top five things about writers.


We are Perfectionists

When entering the industry the first thing that we understood is we are going to neglect our homework, bills, and chores in order to fix the comma in a sentence of a passage we rewrote. This wasn’t anything we planned to do, it just happened that way. Due to our natural sense to overthink there’s also a need to plan, analyze, and edit. With that being said, if you’re going to live with a writer be prepared to hear their keys clicking at four in the morning just because their need to reproduce what was produced is spilling over.


There are Different Kinds of Writers

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Most people think, “oh, you’re a writer so you must want to be a journalist,” not exactly. You see, just how there are a million types of sciences we study, there are also a million kinds of work that people enjoy creating. Personally, I believe that certain writers are born with different innate abilities which makes them good at what they do.

I don’t believe that I would love fiction if I didn’t enjoy a nice mess of chaos. And, journalists wouldn’t be great at finding stories if they weren’t naturally nosey people. That’s just the way that the world of writing works. Just how Ben, the biologist has to not have allergies in order to be outside in nature, the same can be said for Clair, the astrologer, who is always up at night in order to study constellations. Everyone has a reason for why they drink the cup of coffee that they drink.


Most are Entrepreneurs

Whenever I tell people that I’m a writer I always get this side eye. I’ve been approached with, “you write policies?” and “what are you going to do with your poetry?” It’s always the same weird conversation about how my life is going to go as a writer, and, quite frankly, I’m tired of it. You see, writers are some of the most business savvy people you can run into.

Whether we’re journalists, novelists, or screenwriters. Somehow, someway, we know the ins and outs of how to be our own one-stop shop for whatever you need to create. As a writer, I’ve found myself studying many skills that any average businessman needs to survive. And, I’ve run into many, many talented writers who work for themselves, full-time. With that being said, never underestimate the skillset that a writer has because it’s more than just being creative. This is a profession, career, and way of life.


It is a Profession, Pass Time, and Hobby

The way that business people clock in to do accounting, stocks, and conduct transactions are not the ways that writers clock into their desks. That is if they even own a desk because I don’t. Writing is a way of life. Writing places food on my table, love in my heart, and meaning in my days. With that being, without it I’m lacking a great portion of who I am. I’m sure that there are many writers who can relate to this. In fact, it is my profession, pass time, and hobby.

As a profession, I’m able to connect with various other writers in order to ignite change in the way that publishing occurs or talk about the next bestselling novel. Through being a pass time I can blog at five in the morning until I’m too tired to type anymore. And, my hobby allows me to find things to read, critique, and edit. Writing is what I breathe, but, if you’re an accountant, I’m not sure that you can relate to the fullness it brings to life.


Not All of Us Are Alcoholics

There’s this distasteful rumor going around about what we like to do when we create. It’s something along the lines of, “drink.” Well, if we’re being completely honest, I don’t enjoy being drunk or the taste of alcohol. So, I kill the stereotype of writers being drinkers, instantly. More than that, I’ve previously published an article about there being more drinks passed around but don’t believe that they’re all coming from writers. The drinks are from millennials, in general. Listen when I say that just because we enjoy a spirit here and another there it doesn’t mean we’re alcoholics. Perhaps, we just want to unwind.

Now, if you don’t know, please know that I am a student. This is my last semester and it’s my hardest in that I’m juggling work, class time, and writing all in one. But, what I’ve found to be my greatest challenge is staying motivated to blog through it all.

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Many of my avid readers know that I typically am able to queue about a million posts in advanced in order to get through the month and then add more poetry as I go. Well, September hasn’t been so promising when it comes to my work so I’ve been lagging. But, more than that, I know that there are other bloggers out there who have been struggling with staying on top of things, as well. In fact, my numbers for the month of September has dropped so low that I’m embarrassed.

So, I made this post for every blogger who is doing this alone and trying to stay motivated to keep going.


Step 1: Remember Why You Started

People all over the world start blogging for many different reasons, but your reason is unique because it is yours. I remember when I first came up with the idea to blog and my main drive was to be able to leverage book sales straight from my website, that same fire is what keeps me up during hours of the night creating a post for tomorrow, even if I’ve neglected some homework assignment.

Again, your reason is unique to you. Your blog isn’t going to run itself so if you can just find it within yourself to write another post or read someone else’s work you’re doing the world a good deed. That’s more than what you were asked to do the day before.


Step 2: Find Inspiration

Ironically, I wouldn’t be here writing this if it weren’t for the Nicki Minaj and Cardi B drama. As I was scrolling down and going through YouTube’s many tunnels I found that they inspired me to keep trying. It isn’t many black women creating novels, writing movies, or even blogging alone in their beds at four in the morning. However, I am here, and they are there so something has to be given back out into the world if nothing. Watching Cardi B throw her shoe at Nicki Minaj opened the door to come on here today to tell you that your inspiration can come from anywhere. Mine, it so happened to have come from my culture. Tell me about yours.


Step 3: Queue, Queue, and Queue Some More

I know I said previously that I haven’t been able to write, let alone queue posts, but if you can find three minutes within your day to draft up 500 words you’re that much closer to creating work for the next two days. That work is better than nothing else. Your readers want to read, so give them something, days in advance, this way you aren’t stressed out. As for me, I’m getting back into the swing of things, slowly but surely.


Step 4: Just Do It

Your blog can’t be your blog if you don’t do it. So, do it.

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If you’re a writer you probably came to the craft wanting to express something. If it didn’t have anything to do with your personal life perhaps you needed to get your voice across about an event, opinion, or even retell a story. In that way, you knew that you had words that needed to make their way across the page so you began to scribble them down. But, what if you’re a fiction writer and you’re tasked with writing stories? How can you take something personal and create the political through the fiction craft? I’ll tell you the top five ways to incorporate social climate and messages throughout your work.


1. Create Dynamic and Meaningful Characters

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Typically, politics emerge from social interaction. The interaction between two people created something that can be commented on which then gave rise to a government or state. The people are the characters that create a given society so in fiction writing there can be features that set them apart such as a political belief, religion, sex, level of education, or even social class. All of these things work at intersections of identity which then fuses the background of a character and impacts the plot in various ways. In essence, create multicultural characters.


2. Comment and Create a Specific Setting

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There are places in society that can cause more or less social tension to happen. For example, bathrooms can be symbolic in that they can serve as an area where queer people are accepted or denied or where races are divided. Historically, bathrooms have been a place in society that has caused conflict. However, there are other settings such as a park, classroom, or even a restaurant where cultures can clash over politics.


3. Play with Concepts

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The reason why there are so many dystopian novels flying off of the shelf has nothing to do with who the writer is but everything to do with the concept. Most of the time, concepts that are well written revolve around a “what-if” scenario that incorporates some kind of social change. A dystopia is a corrupt society, however, the societal disruption happened due to some flaw in the social climate. So, make a dystopia where the concept is strong enough to be written alongside a multifaceted arc. This will give way to commentary on everyday life by distorting the idea of “what-is.”


4. Retell the Original Story

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The retelling of a specific story can be impactful if the story is clear to the reader. It can also serve as a way to change the way that history was once written. When retelling, sticking to the plot can make it clear as to what is being done, but don’t fear to stray away from the way the original story opens or close. Changing how certain characters are perceived can be a great way to convey a sense of hopefulness or despair in parallelization to our current social climate.


5. Shift the Point of View

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Lastly, changing the point of view can make the reader realize a different truth from another angle. Remember that in fiction in order to make our readers care we have to have amazing characters whose personalities are what we want to follow. If we can hook our reader to watch the story unfold from multiple different lenses then they are more likely to empathize with the political message you’re trying to convey. A great portion of writing an amazing story has to deal with empathy. And, a key component of that is choosing whether it’s the first, third, or rotating point of view that you want your reader to relate to.